Indians get AL-best 102nd victory, beat White Sox

Cleveland Indians' Yan Gomes, left, greets closer Cody Allen after the Indians' win. (Phil Long/AP)

CLEVELAND — Jay Bruce had a two-run single, Josh Tomlin pitched into the sixth inning and the Cleveland Indians got their AL-best 102nd victory, beating the Chicago White Sox 3-1 on Sunday in their regular-season finale.

Cleveland will next play an AL Division Series against the winner of the wild-card game between the Yankees and Twins. The 102 victories were the second most in franchise history behind the 1954 team’s 111.

Jose Ramirez went 2 for 2, including his AL-high 56th double, and Carlos Santana had a sacrifice fly for the Indians, who are seeking a second straight World Series appearance. Bruce’s two RBIs in the first inning gave him 100 for the second time in his career.

Cleveland won 33 of its final 37 games dating to Aug. 24, when it began an AL-record 22-game winning streak. The White Sox went 67-95 in their first year under manager Rick Renteria, posting their worst record since 2013.

Tomlin (10-9) tossed 5 1/3 innings of one-run ball, striking out six and giving the club five pitchers with double-digit victories. The right-hander is penciled in as the Indians’ fourth starter in the playoffs. Cody Allen worked a perfect ninth for his 30th save.

Chris Volstad (1-2) walked Francisco Lindor, Jason Kipnis and Ramirez to begin his day — all scored — before settling into a groove. He allowed three runs over six innings in his second start in the majors since 2012.

Rob Brantly hit a leadoff homer in the fifth to pull the White Sox within 3-1, but they only managed one hit in the final four frames against six relievers.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Indians: Michael Brantley, who returned from a sprained right ankle to pinch hit Saturday night, was hitless in two at-bats. He missed 50 games before returning.

UP NEXT

The Indians await the winner of Tuesday’s wild-card game. Game 1 of the best-of-five Division Series is Thursday at Progressive Field. Cleveland will have home-field advantage over every potential playoff foe, except for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who led the majors in wins.