Flames not looking to move Sam Bennett

The Hockey Night in Canada panel discuss Sam Bennett returning to the lineup for the Flames, the status of Patrik Laine and the struggles of the St. Louis Blues.

Calgary Flames forward Sam Bennett was a healthy scratch Thursday night against the Nashville Predators.

News travels fast and, as Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman pointed out Saturday, it didn’t take long for general managers around the league to pick up their phones.

“I understand that GM Brad Treliving had a lot of phone calls: ‘Does this mean you’re willing to do something here?’” Friedman said during the Headlines segment on Hockey Night in Canada. “Treliving told all the teams, ‘Guys, no. Sam Bennett is not getting traded.’”

Bennett’s position has been a topic of discussion since his arrival in Calgary, and the 20-year-old’s struggles this season have only added to the frustration.

“Is he a centreman? Is he a winger?” said Nick Kypreos. “Don’t rule out the fact that he may ask to be traded if this frustration may continue down the road.”

Bennett has registered nine goals and nine assists in 47 games this season, and has been held off the score sheet entirely in 2017. (His last point came Dec. 27, 2016 against the Colorado Avalanche.)

Bennett will resume his role as a centreman Saturday against the Edmonton Oilers, according to Kelly Hrudey, and will have Johnny Gaudreau and Alex Chiasson on his wings.

“They’re going to see if they can’t spark him that way again,” Hrudey said.

Bennett’s place in the lineup isn’t the only question mark hovering over Calgary lately. Friedman also described the “weird” situation involving Treliving’s contract — or lack thereof.

“The one question Brad Treliving would not answer — and will not answer — is the status of his contract,” Friedman explained. “He’s the only general manager in the NHL who does not have a deal for next year. It’s weird. The Flames won’t comment about it. I’ve been told it’s their position that ‘this is the way we do business’ and it shouldn’t be seen as anything ominous. But … it’s weird. And it runs the risk of them losing their general manager.”

Kypreos agreed.

“It’s one thing if it’s their position that he underachieved and they want to let him go but what happens if they go on a good run? What happens if they go deep in the playoffs?” he said. “You also run the risk of losing a guy that has done a pretty good job.”