Woods, and his back, have challenging schedule after PGA

Tiger Woods waves on the 11th hole during the final round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at TPC Harding Park. (Jeff Chiu/AP)

Tiger Woods doesn’t know how the strange, compressed schedule will affect him for the rest of the year.

Then again, no one else does, either.

“No one has ever experienced this, having a shutdown during the year,” Woods said as he looked ahead to the FedEx Cup playoffs that will be followed two weeks later by the U.S. Open. “It is very different. This is unlike any other year that we’ve ever experienced in golf.”

Woods shot a 3-under 67 on Sunday in the final round of the PGA Championship to finish the tournament at minus-1 — 10 strokes behind leader Dustin Johnson as he waited to tee off. Woods will take next week off before the three-week stretch of the playoffs that begin outside of Boston on Aug. 20; the U.S. Open, which was postponed from June, will be two weeks after the tour championship.

Although the schedule is new for everyone, it will be a special challenge for Woods, who at 44 has a balky back and hasn’t played on back-to-back weekends since the President’s Cup in December.

“We’ve been training for that. Trying to get my strength and endurance up to that ability to making sure that I can handle that type of workload,” Woods said. “We’ll be pushing it hard to make sure that I can stay strong and have the endurance to keep on going.”

Woods struggled at TPC Harding Park for the first three rounds before putting together a solid round on Sunday, when he was already out of contention. He had five birdies and two bogeys, including a 5 on the par-4 18th hole that left him signing for a 67.

If only it had happened sooner.

“If I would have made a few more putts on Friday early on, and the same thing with Saturday, I felt like I would have been right there with a chance come today,” he said. “It didn’t happen, but I fought hard, and today was more indicative of how I could have played on Friday and Saturday if I would have made a few putts early.”

NICE SHOT

Byeong Hun An made the first hole-in-one of the tournament, landing his tee shot on No. 11 about 15 feet from the hole before it bounced a few times and rolled the last three feet.

Usually golfers figure out they landed an ace from the cheering galleries. But with no spectators allowed at TPC Harding Park because of the coronavirus pandemic, it was the scream of a lone volunteer that got the message to An on the tee box 189 yards away.

He belatedly threw up his arms in celebration and had a chuckle with playing partner Sepp Straka.

“Judging by his reaction, it’s got to be,” Straka said.

Tiger Woods was one group ahead of the twosome and had just teed off on No. 12; he missed the commotion while concentrating on his drive. But he had a chance to catch up with An later in the round.

“We got a chance to say congratulations to Ben,” Woods said. “And he owes a round to all of us.”

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