Stephen Brunt
With more than 30 years of experience in sports media, author and award-winning journalist Stephen Brunt has seen and covered it all. Currently a columnist for sportsnet.ca and Sportsnet magazine, Brunt covers a wide range of sports on a daily basis, including baseball, boxing and hockey.
Guy Lafleur's electric image forever etched in Canadiens history
Stephen Brunt
Guy Lafleur was arguably the greatest player on the greatest team in NHL history. And the sight of him on the rush could take the Forum's breath away.
Canada's World Cup journey a seminal moment for sports culture in this country
Stephen Brunt
No one saw Tom Brady coming — and then the myth-making began
Stephen Brunt
As a young quarterback, Tom Brady didn't wow anyone while he was at the University of Michigan or at the NFL combine. He was slow. He wasn’t elusive. His arm was OK but no cannon. So no one saw what was to come for Brady, who officially retired on Tuesday.
Djokovic's deportation shows we do indeed have a breaking point
Stephen Brunt
In other circumstances, tennis superstar Novak Djokovic's arrogance would probably have slipped right by. But not now, not after almost two years of this, not after all the suffering and sacrifice in the name of the common good.
How the greatness of Christine Sinclair made Olympic gold possible
Stephen Brunt
Amid the pause of 2020, hockey was given a chance to start again
Stephen Brunt
Sportsnet's Stephen Brunt reflects on the enormous upheavals that transpired in 2020 and how it has forced not only the hockey world, but everyone to reflect and re-evaluate its traditions and values.
The year we lost sports showed us just how much they anchor our lives
Stephen Brunt
Ritual and tradition help us manage the unpredictable aspects of life. For fans, sports are a big part of that — and 2020 showed us what the world is like without them.
Tyson-Jones Jr. could provide tingles — just don't expect too much
Stephen Brunt
Reflections on a Jackie Robinson Day like no other
Stephen Brunt
As a young man, Jackie Robinson had faith that solutions to racism and inequality were possible working within American institutions. By the time of his death, he may not have been so sure.